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blended learning

How is professional learning changing?

We’ve long thought quality professional learning means pulling educators out of class—where they’re needed most. How do we minimize that? With blended professional learning, we maximize fewer face-to-face seminars and implement more robust job-embedded and online coaching.

From left to right: Debra Walker Smith and the Hoover City Title I Team, Director of Federal Programs and Testing, Hoover City Schools (Ala.); Mitchelle Kelley, National Consultant, Istation

Holistic intervention strategies for Title I schools that coordinate efforts between all educators and stakeholders are crucial to improving achievement. Through focused professional development, incorporating research-based approaches and utilizing technology, intervention efforts at Title I schools can be the most effective.

Just a few years ago, Title I students in Hoover City Schools were making such modest gains that they stayed in the program year after year.

That all changed once the central Alabama district implemented Istation, an e-learning program that identifies learning gaps and provides engaging interactive lessons and face-to-face teaching strategies to get students back on track.

Implemented in Hoover City in the fall of 2015, it is used in Response to Intervention (RTI) for students in grades 1 through 5 in the district’s four Title I schools.

10/30/2017

Nationally, the number of ELL students continues to grow, presenting district administrators with unique challenges. Blended learning that incorporates computer-adaptive assessments and instruction can be a vital resource to meet the needs of these students and help them become proficient in English and succeed academically.

 Cindy Elsberry is the former superintendent of Horry County Schools in South Carolina. The diverse, high-poverty district won national acclaim for its digital transformation under her leadership and was rated as one of the state’s highest-performing districts.

As one of today’s most promising models for instruction, blended learning is growing rapidly across the country. But what really is blended learning, and how can educators use it to improve student outcomes?

Students at Coalinga-Huron USD in California are taught with personalization and Common Core combined, resulting in more authentic activities.

The tech-powered combination of face-to-face classroom instruction with online inquiry that students pursue on their own has progressed into a new phase. But what constitutes blended learning 2.0 varies widely across districts.

Secondary Blended Learning Instructional Delivery Models for Mass Customization

The Downingtown Area School District has broken down the barriers typical learning methods have created in high school.

Ivy Academy, a cyber and blended curriculum initiative, opened three years ago. High school teachers use their own curriculum to teach blended courses face-to-face with students two or three days out of a six-day cycle.

John Albert is the principal of California Elementary School in the Orange Unified School District.

You’ve no doubt heard of the teaching approach in which students spend part of the day learning online at their own pace and part of the day receiving instruction from a classroom teacher. But there are still a number of misconceptions about what blended learning entails and how it works.

Speakers at upcoming conferences (clockwise from top left): Rochelle Gutierrez will speak at NCTM about the next generation mathematics for all; Lisa Nyberg will speak at NSTA about giving students more ownership of their education; Deborah Gaston and  Andrea Kantrowitz will speak at NAEA about adding arts to the sciences.

At three annual conferences this spring—the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM), the National Art Education Association (NAEA) and the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)—experts and educators will offer guidance in developing STEAM instruction across a range a subjects and projects.

Schools provide blended learning opportunities in different ways. State-run virtual schools generally offer only online instruction.

Online learning activity in public districts has overtaken state-level virtual schools and charters, according to the 12th annual “Keeping Pace with K12 Digital Learning” report, released in December.

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