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blended learning

Speakers at upcoming conferences (clockwise from top left): Rochelle Gutierrez will speak at NCTM about the next generation mathematics for all; Lisa Nyberg will speak at NSTA about giving students more ownership of their education; Deborah Gaston and  Andrea Kantrowitz will speak at NAEA about adding arts to the sciences.

At three annual conferences this spring—the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM), the National Art Education Association (NAEA) and the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)—experts and educators will offer guidance in developing STEAM instruction across a range a subjects and projects.

Schools provide blended learning opportunities in different ways. State-run virtual schools generally offer only online instruction.

Online learning activity in public districts has overtaken state-level virtual schools and charters, according to the 12th annual “Keeping Pace with K12 Digital Learning” report, released in December.

With students coming to the classroom with a variety of backgrounds and skill levels in math, it can prove difficult to meet each of their needs. By combining high-quality curriculum, instruction and digital tools, blended learning has the potential to meet each student’s individual needs at their own pace. In this webinar, educators from the United Nations International School (UNIS) in New York City discussed how the school has transitioned to a 21st century math program by combining Cathy Fosnot’s Contexts for Learning Mathematics with adaptive technology to give students more autonomy and to inspire them to take ownership of their math learning.

Whether you have just begun your blended learning journey, or it is a path you have been traveling down for several years, it’s important to stay dynamic and reflective on your practice in order to ensure that your blended initiative is having a positive impact on student success.

When administrators consider implementing blended learning, they tend to start with technology, evaluating what they have or what they need. But what happens after the technology—the operational side of things—is what can really make or break a blended learning initiative.

When resources are scarce and distances are vast, how can school districts leverage curriculum, technology and instructional support to deliver customized learning that breaks the industrial-age barriers of time, space, path and pace? In this web seminar, originally broadcast on February 19, 2015, an administrator from TIE (Technology and Innovation in Education) in the Black Hills Online Learning Community in South Dakota discussed how the organization is leveraging online learning resources to create customized and blended learning opportunities for students.

Personalized blended and online learning programs have helped many districts provide access to more courses and to improve student outcomes. But how do you start a program and then scale it across your school and district? In this web seminar, originally broadcast on March 18, 2015, representatives from Getting Smart and educators from an innovative district in Kentucky discussed the key lessons learned in implementing online and blended learning, and how these programs can benefit teachers and students.

NICOLE BONO
Director, marketing
Fuel Education

While blended learning has become a common topic of discussion and an increasingly common district-level strategy for driving student achievement, strategies for successfully making the transition to this new model of learning are often ignored. In this web seminar, originally broadcast on March 17, 2015, presenters explored best practices and lessons learned from blended learning initiatives.

Online learning proves VITAL to success

Putnam County School System in rural central Tennessee has increased graduation rates and cut need for credit recovery courses in half thanks to a districtwide online learning program that gives students more flexibility and personalized instruction.

Authors Michael Horn and Heather Staker say culture is crucial to innovation in schools.

Blended learning is poised to transform education as we know it. We know the what and the why, but it’s not often we learn how. In their book, Blended, Using Disruptive Innovation to Improve Schools, Michael Horn and Heather Staker lay out the components of successful blended learning programs, and challenge readers to create a culture that can make these innovations succeed.

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