You are here

careers

11/1/2016

The world of work is quickly redefining what it means to be ready—a broader set of goals that reflect fast-paced, complex and diverse workplaces. Students need to be great communicators and critical thinkers that can tackle novel problems. In order to prepare students to be really ready for their futures, we must define what that means for them now—not just once they graduate from high school.

7/26/2016

Teacher and employee engagement has been found to be a crucial component in the success of a school district, positively impacting student achievement, improving employee retention and reducing turnover.

Education leaders are rallying to transform America’s high schools to better prepare students for their future of meeting the economic need of high-skill, high-demand jobs right out of school college. Career readiness programs are igniting a passion for learning in students and providing them opportunities for training and certifications, while keeping them on track to graduate.

2/24/2016

References to vocabulary development are interwoven throughout the College and Career Readiness Standards in what might at first seem like jigsaw puzzle pieces. However, when we learn how to put the pieces together, they reveal a coherent picture. The goal is to provide students with the word knowledge and vocabulary strategies they need to succeed as readers, writers, speakers, listeners, and thinkers across many domains to successfully access text, communicate across the curriculum, and acquire the content knowledge needed for college and careers.

With this web-based platform, teachers can bring a variety of industry professionals, from a chef to a scientist, into the classroom to speak to students. Teachers make requests through Nepris, which automatically matches the skills of professionals to curriculum topic and other activities.

Year: 
2014

These real-world videos highlight jobs from different industries so students can connect educational concepts to college and careers. The videos depict how workers use math, language arts, science and technology. A diverse group of workers with varying educational backgrounds is interviewed to show students the skills they need to achieve their goals.

Year: 
2014
Clinton Community School District Superintendent Deborah A. Olson

Iowa’s Clinton Community School District has incorporated two cutting-edge programs into its learning environment in hopes of giving students a better chance at graduating and succeeding in college or career.

Anoka-Hennepin district students in the seventh-grade technology education class.

In suburban Minneapolis, seventh graders will soon start building skills for local technical jobs that may be open to them when they finish school.

Most students who took the ACT risk falling behind in college and lack the skills necessary to join the modern workforce, according to a report from the company that offers the test. Meanwhile, 31 percent of students tested did not meet any of the assessment’s college benchmarks, which the report says demonstrates the need for a more rigorous curriculum in U.S. schools.

Since 2004, overall interest in STEM majors and careers among high school seniors has increased by more than 20 percent, according to a new report from STEMconnector, an online STEM news source. And the southern states of the U.S. have the highest concentration of students interested in STEM, at 36 percent, compared to other regions.

Released in February, the “Where are the STEM Students?” report revealed that mechanical engineering was the most popular major or career choice among STEM-interested students, at 20 percent, while biology was second at 12 percent.

Pages