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enhancing education through technology

From left to right: Kay Benning, Director of Library Services, Elmbrook Schools (Wis.); Edwin Tucker, Account Manager, OverDrive Education.

Digital reading platforms can enable more personalized learning by providing engaging, interactive and customizable digital content to both students and educators in all subject areas, as well as supplemental curriculum materials, professional development resources, ELL and special education titles, and more.

3/29/2018

Student engagement and enthusiasm are the keys to unlocking literacy success and academic achievement. How can administrators create a district literacy community where every student is engaged, enthusiastic and eager to read grade-level texts? How can school leaders create a culture where English Language Arts is the class that students cannot get enough of?

2/22/2018

The population of ELL students continues to grow, and achievement gaps between ELL students and other student populations persist in many districts. There are a variety of best practices administrators can employ to address these achievement gaps and meet the needs of ELL students.

Nationally, the number of English learners continues to grow, presenting district administrators with unique challenges. Blended learning that incorporates computer-adaptive assessments and instruction can be a vital resource to meet the needs of these students and to help them become proficient in English and succeed academically. 

9/27/2017

In the Ventura USD in California, one low achieving middle school at risk of closure was instead transformed into the De Anza Academy of Technology and the Arts (DATA), a high achieving magnet school. A significant component in DATA’s dramatic turnaround has been its innovative project based and collaborative learning environments and makerspaces, which employ technology as a central component.

At Fremont County School District 6 in Pavillion, Wyo., the diverse population, including a large number of Native American students, poses occasional communication challenges. “Some of these students have cultural and language barriers,” says Diana Clapp, superintendent. “Instructionally, that presents issues in delivering the best education possible to each student.”

Currently, the way most schools think about reading restricts students to the time and space of borrowing one or two books from a school library or classroom collection at a time. However, to improve reading skills, it is helpful to break down those physical barriers. With its extensive digital library, myON Reader from Capstone Digital provides children and community members with a wealth of books that can be accessed anywhere.

Martha Liddell, superintendent of Columbus (Miss.) Municipal School District
Classrooms, libraries, and labs used to be the only spaces where students spent their time. Wireless connections, laptops and project learning have changed that, and VMDO Architects has explored opportunities in buildings and in the landscape. Above, students at John Handley High School in Winchester (Va.) Public Schools gather in the newly renovated math/science wing.

Staying apace of rapidly evolving technologies and the innovative practices they enable remains a major challenge for school and district leaders concerned with keeping students on the upside of an expanding digital divide. As digital innovations emerge that require continuous upgrading of technological infrastructure, hardware and software, as well as training school personnel, district administrators are being called on to be more creative and strategic than ever.

With a vast number of new software and Web-based reading programs on the market, students of all ages and abilities can target specific reading skills, such as comprehension, fluency, phonemic awareness and vocabulary. In addition, access has changed greatly over the last couple of years. Students no longer need to be in a computer lab to use Web-based programs; they can use laptops or tablets as part of a one-to-one computing program or their own devices if their school has a bring-your-own-device policy.

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