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Security chief relies on his experience as a teacher in his job overseeing 39 schools and 70 officers.

MAP FOR SUCCESS—Teachers at the Innovate@BVSD conference in the Boulder Valley School District share new and innovative ways to bring technology into instruction.

With the influx of $20 million in voter-approved “innovation” funds as part of a $576.5 million bond issue came a need for Boulder Valley School District educators and administrators to share ideas to best integrate technology into instruction.

Source: The fifth annual survey of K12 teachers by SheerID and Agile Education Marketing

On average, teachers spent $652 of their own money on classroom supplies, instructional materials and PD in 2018, according to the fifth annual survey of K12 teachers by SheerID and Agile Education Marketing. That marks a 39 percent increase from last year.

Community projects and service learning initiatives allow students to use their classroom skills to benefit the world around them.

From left to right: Luci Willits, Associate Vice President, Policy, Curriculum Associates; Kristopher John, Vice President, Online Assessment, Curriculum Associates; John Lovato, Ed.D., Assistant Superintendent, Educational Services, Rosemead School District (Calif.)

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) requires all Title I schools to use evidence-based educational activities. It is crucial that administrators understand not only how the law defines evidence-based, but also how to apply that definition to their decision-making process when selecting the resources that will meet their district’s needs.

This web seminar featured a discussion about the practical implications of ESSA for administrators, and how to analyze and apply education research to help make more effective strategic decisions in a district.

Patrick J. Kearney is a veteran teacher and an advocate for public education. He currently serves as the facilitator for teacher leadership in Johnston Community Schools in Iowa.

The honest and complex truth is that there are incredible things happening in every school in the country and there are massive challenges being faced by every school as well.

Superintendent Jim McIntyre interacts with Knox County elementary school students.

Knox County Schools is a flourishing district in Tennessee, with most of its 15 high schools having graduation rates above 90 percent. Within the last five years, the district has also has also seen modest gains in reading/language arts, math, science, and social studies as measured by the Tennessee Comprehensive Assessment Program tests for grades 3 through 8.

School districts working to close budget gaps are increasingly requiring parents to pay fees for their children’s textbooks, lab materials, computers, and after-school activities.

It’s a regrettable but widespread trend, says Bruce Hunter, associate executive director of advocacy, policy and communications at the School Superintendents Association. “The recession lasted longer and cut deeper than anyone thought it would,” Hunter says. “Districts try to charge as little as possible, because it’s not popular. It’s a last resort.”

Most districts won’t feel the impact of sequester cuts for another year. But Silver Valley (Calif.) USD is already facing the harsh reality of nearly $500,000 in funding cuts this year alone.

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