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Mike Daugherty is director of technology and information systems at Chagrin Falls Exempted Village Schools in Ohio.

Here are three communication strategies to help educate families and keep them connected when implementing new technology initiatives.

From left to right: Kay Benning, Director of Library Services, Elmbrook Schools (Wis.); Edwin Tucker, Account Manager, OverDrive Education.

Digital reading platforms can enable more personalized learning by providing engaging, interactive and customizable digital content to both students and educators in all subject areas, as well as supplemental curriculum materials, professional development resources, ELL and special education titles, and more.

Robert Sexton has worked with school-based tech for more than 15 years, so there’s not much he hasn’t seen. “Kids are pretty ingenious; keeping up with them is a challenge,” says Sexton, currently the director of technology for Olentangy Local School District, just north of Columbus, Ohio.

That challenge is mitigated by the district’s secret weapon—AristotleInsight::K12by Sergeant Laboratories, which tracks every digital move students make and alerts the district of potential problems.

Guy Barmoha, director of the secondary learning department for Broward County Public Schools in Florida, wanted to challenge high-achieving, middle school mathematics students beyond what acceleration can offer. Elements of Mathematics: Foundations, a curriculum by the Institute for Mathematics and Computer Science, provided the solution.

Where should schools start when it comes to implementing technology?

Barbers Hill ISD is a suburban district along the upper Texas Gulf Coast, and it was one of the first districts in the state with a 1-to-1 Chromebook program.

Following some maintenance and repair issues with students who took their laptops home after school, Barbers Hill decided its 1-to-1 program would continue only in the classroom.

Kim Muldrow, a systems support specialist for Barbers Hill, wanted a solution that differed from laptop carts. That’s when PowerGistics Towers came into the equation during the summer of 2015.

Classrooms in Missouri schools use PowerGistics towers for convenient storage of 1-to-1 technology

An in-school Chromebook 1-to-1 program allows the 3,500 students of Confluence Academy Charter Schools in Saint Louis—only 6 percent of whom have internet access at home—to have access to more personalized learning. When Marcy Dotson, instructional technology coordinator, began planning in spring 2014 for the initial rollout, she knew she needed a practical solution for storing the devices in the classrooms.

At the Challenge to Excellence Charter School (C2E) in Parker, Colorado, educators are using tablets and Google tools in surprising ways to foster creativity, collaboration and content creation in grades K-3, while also establishing a foundation of knowledge-seeking skills that students will use in later grades. In this web seminar, educators from C2E discussed how the school is using Android tabletswith Google Play for Education both inside and outside the classroom for research, projects, field trips and more, how these tools have helped students take ownership of their learning, and the keys to a successful implementation at any school or district.

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