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math curriculum

The path for raising student performance to meet or exceed the new math standards has proven elusive for many schools and districts. After two, three or more years of flat or declining student performance, some educators are beginning to wonder if their students can ever achieve the new standards.

This web seminar featured educators and administrators who have cracked the code and implemented a new math program, Eureka Math/EngageNY Math from Great Minds, with impressive success in districts large and small.

Jill Diniz

New math. Scary words for parents raised on long division and memorization of times tables. Even educator Paige Bergin, who had spent two years teaching fifth-grade math out of a traditional textbook, wasn’t so sure when she was introduced to a new program 13 years ago. 

So Bergin started researching the algorithms taught in Everyday Mathematics® from McGraw-Hill and learned two important things. This so-called “new math” wasn’t actually new.

When it was time for North Kansas City School District in Missouri to adopt a mathematics resource for its elementary school students, a select pool of teachers was asked to evaluate several resources. Eventually, Everyday Mathematics from McGraw-Hill Education was selected as the resource. 

10/24/2017

The path for raising student performance to meet or exceed the new math standards has proven elusive for many schools and districts. After two, three, or more years of flat or declining student performance, some educators are beginning to wonder if their students can ever achieve the new standards.

Champaign Unit 4 School District in Illinois wanted to give its teachers a very clear pathway to evolve their math instruction to meet rigorous, Common Core state standards. 

District leaders were very happy with earlier results from McGraw-Hill’s Everyday Mathematics and saw Everyday Mathematics 4, its latest iteration, as an enticing solution, especially in teaching the Common Core state standards, according to Susan Zola, assistant superintendent for achievement, curriculum and instruction. 

A few years ago, when Acequia Madre Elementary Principal Ahlum Scarola looked at his school’s New Mexico state report card, it showed some troubling numbers.

Dean Deaver’s fourth-grade classroom was struggling with math. His students at Monroe Elementary School in Riverside, California hadn’t benefited from the curriculum the school had used for the past few years, showing little improvement in state tests or in their day-to-day assignments. Many of his 30 students required extra support due to cognitive learning problems or issues at home, and even more were discouraged from consistently testing at a second-grade level. Deaver needed a solution.

A program for all

Learning through problem-solving promotes deep, coherent mathematics understanding. It is a critical tool for creating a highly effective learning environment for students. Through the use of strong routines, students learn how to take an active role in reasoning and sensemaking. Active learning will help students understand new mathematical concepts and relationships as they progress in their school careers.

When two Boston elementary schools needed a core math curriculum,  Everyday Mathematics 4 was the solution

Five years ago, Boston Public School’s John Eliot School in the city’s North End neighborhood was declared an innovation school. What that meant for principal Traci Walker-Griffith was more autonomy in choosing the elementary school’s curriculum for her 570 students. One of the first curricular changes she made was bringing in Everyday Mathematics.

Educators in the Clark County School District in Las Vegas find success using Everyday Mathematics every day

When the Clark County School District in Las Vegas, Nevada, wants to turn around elementary schools, it looks to Principal John Haynal. He’s already improved outcomes at two elementary schools in this, the country’s fifth largest school district. In Clark County’s Franchise School program, principals who have demonstrated academic growth supervise an additional school using the same or similar practices that have led to success while continuing to supervise their original or “flagship” school.

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