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Janet Pittock, Director of Curriculum, McGraw-Hill Education

New approaches to elementary mathematics curriculum, instruction, technology and assessment are providing opportunities to personalize learning for each student, creating highly effective, student-centered learning environments.

In this web seminar, the director of curriculum at McGraw-Hill discussed ideas, strategies and resources for delivering a positive, measurable impact on student outcomes through personalized learning in K6 math instruction. 

Speaker

Janet Pittock
Director of Curriculum
McGraw-Hill Education

Guy Barmoha, director of the secondary learning department for Broward County Public Schools in Florida, wanted to challenge high-achieving, middle school mathematics students beyond what acceleration can offer. Elements of Mathematics: Foundations, a curriculum by the Institute for Mathematics and Computer Science, provided the solution.

When Wicomico County Public Schools implemented common core state standards six years ago, complaints from parents rolled in regarding challenging homework assignments. 

“Parents did not understand so they couldn’t help their children,” explains Julie Dill, elementary math supervisor for the 15,000-student district on the Eastern Shore of Maryland.

Then came Everyday Mathematics 4, a comprehensive math program that enables parents to access lessons and watch videos at home to break down the common core language barrier.

What should change about the current culture of mathematics instruction?

Students in seventh-grade math classes are not necessarily ready for seventh-grade math. They may be rusty in concepts taught in sixth grade, or ready for high-level applications covered in high school.

That is why the ALEKS® personalized learning program from McGraw-Hill Education is an integral part of the math curriculum in Oak Creek-Franklin middle schools, says Annalee Bennin, director of curriculum and assessment for the southeastern Wisconsin district.

In the 10 years leading up to Madison School District’s latest math curriculum update, state standards had changed almost too often to count. So it is understandable that the Phoenix-based district would welcome a program that ensured all material complied with current standards. 

The small rural district of United Local Schools in northeast Ohio has seen its math scores increase in the eight years it has used Everyday Mathematics® in its elementary school classrooms.

In 2015-16, the first school year in which all sixth-grade students had used Everyday Mathematics since kindergarten, those students scored 26.8 percentage points higher than the state average in state math tests. Yet the numbers don’t tell the whole story.

Elementary teachers at Stamford Public Schools in Connecticut, leverage data they gather through observation and evaluation, as well as test scores, to drive classroom math instruction. The technology in their math curriculum, McGraw-Hill Education’s Everyday Mathematics 4®, allows teachers to easily record data and provides detailed reports they use to identify students that might be struggling to master specific state standards, as well as those that are ready for a challenge.

The path for raising student performance to meet or exceed the new math standards has proven elusive for many schools and districts. After two, three or more years of flat or declining student performance, some educators are beginning to wonder if their students can ever achieve the new standards.

This web seminar featured educators and administrators who have cracked the code and implemented a new math program, Eureka Math/EngageNY Math from Great Minds, with impressive success in districts large and small.

Jill Diniz

New math. Scary words for parents raised on long division and memorization of times tables. Even educator Paige Bergin, who had spent two years teaching fifth-grade math out of a traditional textbook, wasn’t so sure when she was introduced to a new program 13 years ago. 

So Bergin started researching the algorithms taught in Everyday Mathematics® from McGraw-Hill and learned two important things. This so-called “new math” wasn’t actually new.

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