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personalized learning

 Cindy Elsberry is the former superintendent of Horry County Schools in South Carolina. The diverse, high-poverty district won national acclaim for its digital transformation under her leadership and was rated as one of the state’s highest-performing districts.

As one of today’s most promising models for instruction, blended learning is growing rapidly across the country. But what really is blended learning, and how can educators use it to improve student outcomes?

Professional development is a key component of any district, but what takes professional learning to the next level of engagement and effectiveness is being able to differentiate and personalize professional growth for each teacher or administrator. In the recent Personalized Professional Learning Survey sponsored by Performance Matters (formerly Truenorthlogic), over 500 educators from around the country shared their insights on best practices and challenges for creating a personalized professional learning climate in their school districts.

Connecting Students’ Futures to Their Learning

Engaging students by connecting learning to their future career goals with small groups creates unique success at Cuyahoga Falls City School District in Ohio.

The district developed small learning communities in grades 7 through 12, teaching traditional curriculum through the lenses of student interests, says Superintendent Todd Nichols.

ASD iSchool

The online iSchool initiative in Anchorage, Alaska expands disadvantaged students’ access to advanced coursework and gives all learners more flexibility to sign up for electives, voc-tech classes and after-school activities.

Enrollment in the Anchorage School District program has nearly tripled, from about 500 students a semester to 1,300 in spring 2016—and 92 percent earn passing grades. A summer school component gives another 1,000 students a chance to recover lost credits or keep from falling behind.

Personalized learning has become a catch-all phrase, often used to describe technology in the classroom rather than a new approach to teaching and learning. In order for personalized learning to effectively improve student outcomes, however, there are four key components that must be a part of any district’s personalized learning environment.

5/31/2016

Personalized learning has become a catch-all phrase, often used to describe technology in the classroom rather than a new approach to teaching and learning. In order for personalized learning to effectively improve student outcomes, however, there are four key components that must be a part of any district’s personalized learning environment.

Attend this web seminar to learn what the Core 4 elements are and how to align professional development to them. It is only when all four are in place that personalized learning succeeds and student achievement increases.

Half of school districts nationwide believe they’ve completed their 1-to-1 initiatives and the infrastructure required. (Click to enlarge)

The digital classroom is no longer a new concept—half of school districts nationwide believe they’ve completed their 1-to-1 initiatives and the infrastructure required, according to the annual Digital School Districts Survey from the Center for Digital Education, published in March.

CP2.0 Personalized Learning—Anytime, Anywhere

In response to an influx of new technology—ranging from iPads to learning management systems to digital resources—Crown Point researched and launched CP2.0, a multifaceted 10-year strategic plan to develop personalized learning.

Baltimore County Public Schools (BCPS) is in the middle of a multiyear transformation known as S.T.A.T. (Students and Teachers Accessing Tomorrow). Initiated in 2013, the goal of S.T.A.T. is ambitious: To cultivate a 21st century technology learning environment for its 111,000 students that prepares globally competitive graduates.

Cleveland City Schools Director Martin Ringstaff saw a personalized learning opportunity in a school trip to Nicaragua.

An engineering project in a Tennessee high school grew into a mission to build an innovative dome to grow fresh food for a Central American orphanage. The adventure inspired Cleveland City Schools Director Martin Ringstaff to spread a personalized, project-based learning approach to more of his students.

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