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STEM

Inspiring kids to pursue STEM education is more than just a good idea—the economic viability of our country's future nearly depends on it. A new Web video series, Advanced Technological Education Television (ATETV), does just this by showing students where their interests in math and science can lead them in terms of a college education and careers. Supported with a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program began by partnering with community colleges nationwide and teaming up with technological industry employers.

Kathy Cox, the superintendent of schools for Georgia, believes "excellence is not an accident."

She made a name for herself by winning $1 million proving she was smarter than a fifth-grader on a popular television show. And since her election in 2002, Cox has earned complaints and kudos for tackling testing and implementing new curriculum standards and graduation requirements for Georgia.

As she prepares for possible reelection next fall, she remains committed "to be part of the solution"— a promise she made to her students when she entered politics over a decade ago.

For many students, natural science seems irrelevant to everyday life. Whether they are teaching biology or physics, unless they explicitly show students how formulas and processes apply to their own lives, teachers run the risk of disengaging students and allowing their minds to wander freely.

 

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