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At Fremont County School District 6 in Pavillion, Wyo., the diverse population, including a large number of Native American students, poses occasional communication challenges. “Some of these students have cultural and language barriers,” says Diana Clapp, superintendent. “Instructionally, that presents issues in delivering the best education possible to each student.”

Kansas City Public Schools in Missouri lost accreditation in January 2012. As part of the effort to improve schools, district leaders asked MindMixer to create an engagement platform, the KCPS Forum. Parents can access the forum through a web browser or app on their phone and pitch ideas for improving the district.

When districts use WillowTree Apps, which designs engagement platforms, parents only have to use one login and get access to everything—school calendar, attendance, work—in one space.

New platforms are giving parents the chance to track their children’s progress without having to schedule a parent-teacher conference.

Two-thirds of educators say that a major frustration in searching for instructional materials online is the number of irrelevant results, a 2013 survey found. The Learning Resource Metadata Initiative (LRMI), created by the Association of Educational Publishers and Creative Commons, seeks to solve this problem by providing a framework for describing educational content and products on the web.

Administrators spend a lot of time and funds on implementing education technology in their schools. However, such programs can only be valuable tools if students have the digital skills necessary to use technology effectively. This web seminar, orgininally broadcast on April 18, 2013, featured administrators from the Phillipsburg (N.J.) School District, who described its successful implementation of the EasyTech curriculum from Learning.com.

The need for high-speed internet in schools is growing exponentially. District Administration spoke with four administrators from around the country about what is driving current bandwidth-consumption trends, what impact increased bandwidth has on tight budgets, and what the future of bandwidth looks like for K12 schools.

JIM RARUS

Does your district have 20 minutes every two weeks to get students proficient in technology? That’s all it’s taken for elementary students in the Phillipsburg (N.J.) School District, thanks to EasyTech, a self-paced interactive curriculum that teaches students critical technology skills in the context of core curriculum and real-world challenges.

MOOCs require new skills from teachers and students
Andover (Mass.) Public Schools student can take MOOCs on biology, social justice, and Greek mythology.

K12 educators and administrators are beginning to experiment with the “massive open online courses”—better known as MOOCs—that have taken the higher education world by storm. In the name of academic experimentation and democratization, hundreds of colleges and universities are offering these courses free to anyone with an internet connection. Many of the courses attract thousands of participants.

At the Chino Valley (Calif.) USD, Ruben S. Ayala Senior High School’s concert percussion ensemble uses digital displays from ViewSonic to enhance their performances. The vivid colors and crisp images that the displays project help make Ayala Senior High consistently one of the top teams in competitions. The ensemble can hang the signage with a crane 13 feet in the air, or use them as a stage and perform on top of them.

Schools are using digital signs more widely to convey information to students, faculty, and visitors. From emergency alerts to event schedules to touch screens to more creative uses—like backdrops for marching bands—digital signs are replacing posters that can clutter up a school, and are making communication more attractive, interactive, and efficient.

The evolution of digital signage

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