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student achievement

11/8/2017

The past two decades have seen 1:1 computing grow in popularity, with school districts across the country deploying millions of laptops and tablets to students, excited by their potential to enhance learning. But unfortunately, with the trend came the reality that many school systems didn’t adequately plan, prepare for or sustain their 1:1 initiatives, and failed to see positive impacts as a result. Why do some 1:1 initiatives succeed and others fail?

10/19/2017

Districts are increasingly tasked with providing options for at-risk and underserved student populations to address persistent achievement gaps. While nationwide gains in closing achievement gaps have been made, research shows that underserved student populations still achieve at lower rates than their peers in many areas.

Andre Spencer is the superintendent, Rupak Gandhi is the research, data, and accountability officer, and Laurie Eastup is the RDA Coordinator at Harrison School District Two in Colorado Springs.

In the 2010-11 school year, the Harrison School District Two in Colorado Springs began one of the most rigorous pay-for-performance plans in the nation: Called “Effectiveness and Results,” this overhaul of the human capital management system was a risk worth taking because the status quo failed to adequately serve students.

This service creates customizable postgraduate surveys for districts. Administrators can write questions that ask graduates about the quality of education they received. LifeTrack will create and mail the survey to the former students and follow up with a phone call. It compiles the data and sends a report to administrators.

Year: 
2013

This April marks the 30th anniversary of the controversial Reagan-era report “A Nation at Risk”—and little has changed since.

Students in five states will soon spend at least 300 extra hours in the classroom for the next three years or more, thanks to an initiative that aims to increase student achievement across socioeconomic lines by providing more in-school educational opportunities, announced last December.

In the last 60 years, America’s K12 public school system has experienced far greater growth in employing administrators and non-teaching staff than employing teachers or students, a new report found. This growth occurred in virtually all 50 states, and did not correspond to increased student achievement.

Though states are making progress in supporting effective school data use, they must do more to ensure that stakeholders like teachers and parents can easily access information, according to the annual state analysis report, “Data for Action 2012,” released by the Data Quality Campaign, a nonprofit that advocates school data access for all stakeholders.

A holistic view of a student’s progress is now available, with help from the U.S. Department of Education. eScholar myTrack is the first commercially available collaborative platform in which administrators, teachers, support staff, students, and parents can see an individualized, holistic view of a student’s progress across their entire education career. myTrack uses data from the MyData Button, a U.S. DOE-facilitated industry movement encouraging schools and software vendors to allow students to download their own data to create a personal learning profile.

Michelle RenéeSchool turnaround policies that include firing and replacing teachers and administrators in hopes of raising test scores are actually detrimental to schools, according to a report from the National Education Policy Center.

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