You are here

Security

From DA

Sanctuary city school districts brace for executive order to withhold funds

Angela Pascopella
March, 2017
SCHOOLS SOURCE: Pew Research Center, "Overall Number of U.S. Immigrants Holds Steady Since 2009"

School districts in Los Angeles and other sanctuary cities are bracing for an impact from President Trump’s executive order to withhold federal support from sanctuary cities.

Gauging the danger schools face

Jennifer Fink
March, 2017
PLAYING IT SAFE—On December 15, 2015, LAUSD closed after receiving a threat of an attack with guns and bombs. Officials gathered later in day, above, to discuss the closing. From left to right: Police Chief Charlie Beck, State Superintendent Tom Torlakson, Sheriff Jim McDonnell, schools’ police chief Steven K.  Zipperman, LA Mayor Eric Garcetti and school board president Steve Zimmer. New York dismissed the warning as a hoax.

Los Angeles USD and the New York City Department of Education both received electronic bomb threats on December 15, 2015. LAUSD called off school. New York students remained in class. Which district made the right call?

How to let the best data drive better decisions in K12

Jennifer Fink
February, 2017
Metro Nashville Public Schools has 25 data specialists and managers considering data. Even one person focused on data is a step forward. (GettyImages.com: Alex Doubovitsky)

K12 education lags behind U.S. business and industry when it comes to using data to improve outcomes, says a 2016 report by the Center for Data Innovation.

Does corporal punishment have a place in schools?

Shawna De La Rosa
February, 2017
Corporal punishment can be used in schools for smaller infractions such as cell phone use during class, according to a 2008 report from the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights and ACLU, as well as a 2015 North Carolina Department of Education report.

While the controversial practice of corporal punishment declines, it remains legal in 19 states. In those states, boys, black students and children with disabilities are more likely to receive physical punishment than other students, according to recent report by the Society for Research in Child Development.

Sponsored Content