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Classroom Integration

From DA

The learning power of reality in K12 education

Angela Pascopella and Bob Violino
October, 2016
Greenwood Elementary School in Minnesota exposes young students to augmented reality using a mobile device and Aurasma. Left, Principal Brad Gustafson shows off his business card, which comes to life with him sinking a basketball into the net, thanks to tech tools.

Using tablets, apps and YouTube videos, students at a Minnesota elementary school have added new virtual elements to paintings and other artwork, so their masterpieces include videos that not only get them engaged, but also help them better understand ideas behind the art itself.

Blended learning magnifies a teacher’s power

Cindy Elsberry
September, 2016
 Cindy Elsberry is the former superintendent of Horry County Schools in South Carolina. The diverse, high-poverty district won national acclaim for its digital transformation under her leadership and was rated as one of the state’s highest-performing districts.

As one of today’s most promising models for instruction, blended learning is growing rapidly across the country. But what really is blended learning, and how can educators use it to improve student outcomes?

K12 product Focus: Projectors

Ray Bendici
September, 2016
BenQ MS527E

Although traditional projectors remain popular, many school districts now opt for ultra short-throw, interactive devicesall-in-one solutions that replace the costs and technological support once needed for whiteboards, flat screen monitors and other display technologies.

Ultra short-throw projectors—which can be mounted above a blank surface or a whiteboard—provide bright, shadowless images and can be connected to any number of display sources, including laptops and tablets.

Neuroscience drives universal design instruction

Ryan Lacey
September, 2016
Universal Design for Learning, or UDL, leverages the what, how and why stages of learning. (Gettyimages.com: sergey7777)

A new teaching model that’s gaining traction in classrooms bases instruction on how different areas of the brain function. The Universal Design for Learning (UDL) consists of three primary principles to leverage the what, how and why stages of learning.

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