You are here

Mobile

From DA

Richer responses, faster feedback in class

Ryan Lacey
November, 2016
WHO KNOWS THE ANSWER?—A teacher at Immaculata-La Salle High School in Miami reviews an analysis report with her students to discover concepts they are struggling with to better inform instruction for the rest of the class.

Two decades ago, most student response systems were simple clickers that could only record and display answers to multiple-choice or yes-no questions. But now, many systems let students enter free-form responses to questions. Teachers can see those responses as they are entered, and can provide immediate feedback.

Comfort and class: School furniture

Ray Bendici
November, 2016
Hub, by Middle Atlantic Products

As teaching has evolved with the increase of educational technology, so has the classroom space itself. Many schools are creating more comfortable, coffee shop-like collaborative environments with a new breed of desks, chairs and work tables.

The learning power of reality in K12 education

Angela Pascopella and Bob Violino
October, 2016
Greenwood Elementary School in Minnesota exposes young students to augmented reality using a mobile device and Aurasma. Left, Principal Brad Gustafson shows off his business card, which comes to life with him sinking a basketball into the net, thanks to tech tools.

Using tablets, apps and YouTube videos, students at a Minnesota elementary school have added new virtual elements to paintings and other artwork, so their masterpieces include videos that not only get them engaged, but also help them better understand ideas behind the art itself.

School mimics Pokémon Go to help new students adjust

Ryan Lacey
October, 2016
Is that a giraffe in the hallway? Using the app, Aurasma, new students at Greenwood Elementary in Minnesota play Grizz-e-mon to feel more familiar and safe in their new school. In the example above, students “freed” this giraffe from inside of an egg.

One elementary school in Minnesota riffed on the wildly popular Pokémon Go app to create its own virtual reality game that helps incoming students feel more comfortable with beginning the school year in an unfamiliar building.

Sponsored Content