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Policy & Compliance

From DA

K12 educators, lawmakers divided over graduation tests

Jessica Terrell
February, 2017
In the last two years, Multiple states, including California and Arizona, have dropped or suspended exit exams in high schools.

Efforts to implement new high school graduation exams in Ohio and New Jersey are faltering, as some educators grow more concerned about the number of students struggling to meet the strict requirements. 

Does corporal punishment have a place in schools?

Shawna De La Rosa
February, 2017
Corporal punishment can be used in schools for smaller infractions such as cell phone use during class, according to a 2008 report from the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights and ACLU, as well as a 2015 North Carolina Department of Education report.

While the controversial practice of corporal punishment declines, it remains legal in 19 states. In those states, boys, black students and children with disabilities are more likely to receive physical punishment than other students, according to recent report by the Society for Research in Child Development.

Schools closing the discipline gap

Jessica Ablamsky
February, 2017
Experts agree replacing zero-tolerance policies  with alternatives that help every student thrive in K12 is important, regardless of challenges they face at home and in their communities. (GettyImages)

In the wake of a divisive presidential election, hundreds of students from about a dozen high schools in Oakland, California, cut class last November to voice their discontent with President-elect Donald Trump. 

Getting literal about media literacy in K12

Steven Wyman-Blackburn
February, 2017
“The solution is always ‘Google it.’ And that’s what happens. I have a problem with ‘Google it.’” —Kenneth Eastwood, superintendent, Middletown City School District in New York, referring to media literacy as the solution in schools

The issue of fake news drew national attention during the 2016 presidential campaign, when fabricated stories were widely accepted as genuine. According to recent research, the problem extends to K12 classrooms, where students have trouble judging the credibility of online information.

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