K12 Headlines

11/14/2014

11/14/2014

Smart advocates urge the state board and lawmakers to see Alabama’s schools as a garden needing cultivation — with money, resources and personnel. Yes, that’s expensive. But Alabama’s historic tendency to pay for education on the cheap has proven to be a fallacy that fails the state and its children. It doesn’t work.

11/14/2014

LGBT high school students in Maryland constantly hear derogatory remarks and are often verbally, physically and sexually harassed and assaulted by their classmates, according to a 2013 survey of LGBT secondary students. Fewer than half report the abuse.

11/14/2014

Blackboard Inc. has acquired ParentLink, uniting two K12 communications providers. ParentLink currently supports more than eight thousand schools.

11/14/2014

A Tennessee inventor and InventHelp created a learning tool for early readers to encourage reading literacy. The EASY READER helps readers focus, track words and keep their place as they read. The invention features a fun and practical design that is easy to use by children, parents, teachers and librarians.

11/14/2014

Leila W. Williams has been appointed the new superintendent of the South Carolina school district. She has 35 years of experience as an educator, including 19 years of educational leadership at the district level in the Colleton County School District.

11/13/2014

11/13/2014

 A West Oakland charter school is partnering with an affordable housing developer to combine academics and apartments by building a new $9.5 million elementary school that will be finished in time for classes next fall.

11/13/2014

Houston ISD leaders are preparing to give children as young as four the opportunity to learn Arabic, as understanding of the language has become increasingly important in business and government. The school board will vote to open one of the nation's first Arabic immersion elementary schools.

11/13/2014

An additional $250 million for is up for grabs for public schools to expand college and career readiness programs for students. Through pathways, schools connect students to regional employers. The second round of funding of the California Career Pathways Trust will be distributed to select recipients next year.

11/13/2014

By the end of this school year, six city schools will shut their doors for good. It’s a cost-cutting plan designed to save the district millions and free up money to renovate dozens of other schools.

11/13/2014

The growing Puyallup School District, already home to 231 portable classrooms, is facing an increasing perennial space crunch. Puyallup voters have rejected new school construction bonds in recent years. Board members also seem reluctant to consider more drastic options, such as double-shifting or year-round school.

11/13/2014

"Children before concrete” is one of the catchphrases of people who’ve been fighting transportation funding in the Washington Legislature. It’s a false choice. Smart investments in highway and transit infrastructure don’t steal money from schools and social welfare programs. They create jobs and expand the economy, helping pay for public services that benefit children.

11/13/2014

New charter schools don’t always make it. When they fail, for academic or financial reasons, they tend to take taxpayer funds with them, pushing the children back into the district-run schools without the funding the state is supposed to provide.

11/13/2014

A Louisiana elementary school and an Arizona junior high school are working to increase math and reading support for students by using free licenses offered by Learning Upgrade. Teachers can enroll students into any of the Math Upgrade and English Upgrade courses, which feature songs, video and games.

11/13/2014

Curriculum Associates has expanded its Ready Mathematics program to include a student "Practice and Problem Solving Book," as well as online Math Center Activities for grades 2–5, to help students further develop conceptual understanding, problem-solving strategies and procedural fluency.

11/13/2014

Faced with a growing student population, nine overcrowded schools have been identified for possible limits on enrollment by Wake County school administrators in North Carolina while school planners also suggested keeping enrollment caps in place at 10 other schools.

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