K12 Headlines

6/25/2014

6/25/2014

July 14–17, 2014
Santa Fe, N.M.

6/25/2014

September 19–22, 2014
Kissimmee, Fla.

6/25/2014

October 2–3, 2014
Rohnert Park, Calif.

6/25/2014

Youth Digital released its online 3D Printing & Modeling 1 course for children (ages 8-14). Students will work with Blender, a professional-level, open-source 3D modeling and animation suite, to sculpt, texture, arrange and render their own 3D creation. At the end of the course, students can order 3D prints of their creations from Shapeways.

6/25/2014

Four school districts in the Madison area have been awarded state grants to enhance STEM course offerings. The area districts are four of 15 districts in Wisconsin sharing $250,000 in STEM funding for the 2014-2015 school year. Approved projects will include collaboration with institutes of higher learning, business, industry or community-based organizations that serve youth.

6/25/2014

Massachusetts could become one of the first states to make a financial commitment to developing state computer science standards and curriculums. We are at a rare juncture where business and government can come together to prepare our state and our workers for the future. We must seize this opportunity.

6/25/2014

Education technology companies often overlook the priorities and circumstances of small- to medium-sized public school systems. A recent Clayton Christensen Institute report showed that, regardless of what vendors think or want, schools are cobbling solutions together from a variety of software providers.

6/25/2014

P-TECH, New York's new technology-infused college and career-training program for high school students, has hired Natasha Walkowicz Shea as its new principal. Most recently, she was the principal of Greenwood Lake Elementary School in Orange County. Walkowicz Shea's new job and the new school are funded by a $2.1 million grant intended to get the P-TECH program off the ground over the next few years.

6/25/2014

In high schools around the country, more departing seniors are electing to study computer science, mathematics, engineering and science in college than are graduates of just a few years ago. The increase also reflects the emphasis that school and business leaders have been placing on better preparing students for a future in which virtually every occupation has embraced technology.

6/25/2014

Google launched a $50 million initiative, Made With Code, to teach young girls how to code. In its research, Google has found that there were four major factors that determined whether girls opted into computer science: social encouragement, self-perception, academic exposure and career perception.

6/25/2014

Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback presented districts with checks for increasing participation in the state’s Career and Technical Education program, which covers tuition for students taking technical courses and rewards school districts with $1,000 for every student that obtains an industry certification. More than 8,000 students participated statewide.

6/25/2014

Winchester Foundation for Educational Excellence is partnering with Winchester Public Schools on a new campaig called "powerED Up, Transforming Classrooms." It designed to ensure the seamless integration of technology into each school. The foundation is kicking off the campaign with a $100,000 gift to address inadequate network infrastructure in Winchester schools. The three-year private fundraising goal is $850,000.

6/25/2014

The legislature recently acted to pass legislation that fixes some of the unintended consequences of the Michigan Merit Curriculum, which was designed to provide students with the skills they need to be successful in the future. In practice, the curriculum proved to do just the opposite for a large segment of our students, leading to a skills gap that has slowed our state’s economic growth.

6/25/2014

The Hollister School District is adding new technology and teacher support jobs, including four site-specific technology specialists. Under the state's new funding formula, the district will get $3.78 million more in 2014-2015 than it received this school year.

6/25/2014

Common Core assessments are making testing easier for students with special needs. The computer-based exams include tools such as on-screen calculators, read-aloud instructions and descriptive videos to enhance accessibility for students with disabilities while keeping them in the classroom with their peers.

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