K12 Headlines

11/5/2014

11/5/2014

Judging public schools on test scores has a serious, perhaps fatal, flaw. That’s the notion all learning is dependent on what happens within a school building between a teacher and a student. A key component is left out of such a calculus: parents.

11/5/2014

Colorado has voted to require that school board negotiations with unions be open to the public. Proposition 104 requires school boards to allow the public to see negotiations on collective bargaining agreements, or union contracts.

11/5/2014

A $54.6 million proposal for renovations and additions and a $44.8 million facilities improvement plan were two of the largest school referendums in the state that passed. Voters in Dodgeville rejected a controversial $48 million proposal to build a high school and close a rural school.

11/5/2014

More than 55 percent of the district's voters said no to a new combination operating and permanent-improvement levy that would have brought in about $7 million a year. As a result, the district will raise pay-to-play fees, end busing for 1,200 students and lay off administrators, technology support staff and 55 teachers.

11/5/2014

A trio of candidates endorsed by the Jersey City teachers union appears to have won nearly twice as many votes as their competition in the contested school board race. The teachers union's victory is a significant defeat for Schools Superintendent Marcia V. Lyles.

11/5/2014

The content for Learning.com's Project NextTech high school digital literacy course is based on curriculum developed by Generation YES. Project NextTech addresses the 24 performance indicators in the ISTE Standards for Students with learning experiences, projects and a final portfolio.

11/5/2014

The Los Angeles County Office of Education’s Head Start-State Preschool Division is implementing a tiered model of intervention across all 16 of its delegate agencies. In 2016, the department plans to use the new edition of myIGDIs to begin monitoring the refined early literacy and early numeracy components of its RtI program.

11/5/2014

Five short-throw projectors were introduced by Epson. The PowerLite 520, 525W, 530, and 535W projectors and the BrightLink 536Wi interactive projector allow teachers to wirelessly connect up to 50 devices and share students’ work from up to four device screens simultaneously.

11/5/2014

GuideK12 launched SchoolSearch, an online communication tool that districts can provide to parents for more informed decisions on school locations and boundaries and program selection.

11/5/2014

Pasco County is poised to become the latest school district to take a formal stance against the direction of Florida's testing and accountability system. Board members are concerned about the number of tests and how quickly the state is switching to tests associated with the Common Core State Standards.

11/5/2014

A record number of homeless students are attending West Virginia’s public schools, according to the National Center for Homeless Education. Of the over 8,300 students labeled as homeless last school year, about 70 percent of those students are living with grandparents or several family members. Nearly 25 percent are living in shelters.

11/5/2014

An increasing number of districts are using e-learning to keep class in session during bad weather and to meet the required number of instruction days without having to add makeups to the calendar. Some districts are developing lesson plans specifically for digital snow days. Others offer more time to complete assignments given on snow days.

11/4/2014

11/4/2014

In Tennessee, Metro Nashville Public Schools students can start applying for the school they want to attend, and a new process allows high school students to pick a school based on academic interests.

11/4/2014

Less than half of the Louisiana voucher students who took the LEAP and iLEAP exams passed this year: 44 percent, according to data released by the Louisiana Department of  Education. In comparison, 69 percent of public school students passed those exams statewide.

11/4/2014

Louisiana's top court dismissed a lawsuit filed on behalf of thousands of New Orleans public school workers who were fired after Hurricane Katrina. The court said the fired employees' due-process rights were not violated. If the decision stands, it will spare the state and Orleans Parish costs that were expected to surpass $1 billion.

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