K12 Headlines

5/22/2015

5/22/2015

Nell K. Duke and Scholastic debuted Information in Action, a new professional development tool that guides teachers to use project-based instruction to help students become better readers and writers of informational text.

5/22/2015

After serving Visalia USD for eight years, current Redwood High School Principal Fernie Marroquin will next year transition into a superintendent position at Tulare's Oak Valley Union Elementary School District. Kerry Beauchaine, the current superintendent, is retiring after this school year.

5/22/2015

Sunburst Digital, Inc. and Parlor Labs partnered bring Ponder, a browser add-on and iOS app used to create micro-responses and annotations. Teachers and students are using Ponder to manage open-ended, self-directed learning across the internet, PDFs and videos.

5/22/2015

The Louisiana Senate approved a bill that would bar public and charter schools from suspending or expelling elementary school students for violating school uniform rules.

5/22/2015

After analyzing feedback from parents and others, the controversial new standardized test in Illinois will be streamlined to be shorter and easier to take next year. The two testing windows will be combined into one in addition to a reduction in the total test time.

5/22/2015

Changing the state education funding formula to reflect more up-to-date special education enrollment numbers and costs would help relieve pressures on school budgets and provide school districts more flexibility in meeting student needs.

5/22/2015

With tougher emissions standards looming and the constant pressure to save money, propane has become increasingly attractive as an alternative to traditional fossil fuels for some vehicles. Of the top 25 school bus markets, 19 have propane-fueled vehicles in their fleets.

5/21/2015

5/21/2015

Michigan's student population has been gradually shrinking for years. The state has 1,550,802 students this school year, down more than 51,000 from five years ago and down 13,312 from 2013-14. There are major financial consequences to losing students, since Michigan's education funding is primarily based on how many students are enrolled in a district.

5/21/2015

A former high school student is suing the Illinois High School Association over its head-injury policies, making it the first state association that could face class-action scrutiny and the latest football governing body to be sued over concussions.

5/21/2015

The schools plan by Republicans on the Joint Finance Committee would boost spending on public schools instead of cutting it by $127 million over two years as Gov. Scott Walker has proposed. It would also require the state to come up with education guidelines separate from the Common Core standards.

5/21/2015

Chicago's public school system is contemplating reversing a decision to not allow the sale of any vacant school properties to charter schools since the mass closings of schools in 2013. Taxpayers end up paying extra to charter schools who are forced to rent on the private market in addition to paying to maintain the 40 empty school buildings the city already owns.

5/21/2015

A record 99 percent of school budgets passed in New York with just nine spending plans rejected. New York's nearly 700 school districts proposed an average spending increase of 1.9 percent and a tax levy increase of 1.6 percent.

5/21/2015

To standardize the criteria that colleges use for granting credit for AP tests, lawmakers are considering passing a law to require public universities and colleges in Illinois to give course credit for scores of 3 or better.

5/21/2015

Students in Kentucky are plotting their career paths and finding the grants, scholarships and other funds to pursue their paths as part of the kid-FRIENDLy initiative, a program funded in 2012 by the largest Race To The Top-District grant awarded.

5/21/2015

The Michigan Legislature is on its way to repealing the state's prevailing wage law. The measure artificially drives up the costs of public construction projects for schools and other government buildings. That's bad for taxpayers, school districts and job seekers.

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