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data driven decision

From left to right: Serapio Trillayes, Executive Director of Curriculum and Instruction, Rio Grande City CISD (Texas); Karen Ingram, National Education Consultant, Istation

There are a variety of steps that administrators can take to create a data-driven district culture that will help teachers use the right data in the right way to address the diverse learning needs of students and lead powerful learning outcomes across schools.

From left to right: Kay Benning, Director of Library Services, Elmbrook Schools (Wis.); Edwin Tucker, Account Manager, OverDrive Education.

Digital reading platforms can enable more personalized learning by providing engaging, interactive and customizable digital content to both students and educators in all subject areas, as well as supplemental curriculum materials, professional development resources, ELL and special education titles, and more.

9/13/2018

There are a variety of steps that administrators can take to create a data-driven district culture, by helping teachers to use the right data in the right way to address the diverse learning needs of students, leading to powerful learning outcomes across schools.

Why is personalized learning so important?

Marcy: It leverages a student’s interests, their strengths, then tailors instruction to their specific needs and goals.

Rich: It gets into predictive analytics. Traditionally the analytics type of reporting is a look at what has been happening. Personalized learning is looking at what is going to happen.

From left to right: Debra Walker Smith and the Hoover City Title I Team, Director of Federal Programs and Testing, Hoover City Schools (Ala.); Mitchelle Kelley, National Consultant, Istation

Holistic intervention strategies for Title I schools that coordinate efforts between all educators and stakeholders are crucial to improving achievement. Through focused professional development, incorporating research-based approaches and utilizing technology, intervention efforts at Title I schools can be the most effective.

From left to right: Luci Willits, Associate Vice President, Policy, Curriculum Associates; Kristopher John, Vice President, Online Assessment, Curriculum Associates; John Lovato, Ed.D., Assistant Superintendent, Educational Services, Rosemead School District (Calif.)

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) requires all Title I schools to use evidence-based educational activities. It is crucial that administrators understand not only how the law defines evidence-based, but also how to apply that definition to their decision-making process when selecting the resources that will meet their district’s needs.

This web seminar featured a discussion about the practical implications of ESSA for administrators, and how to analyze and apply education research to help make more effective strategic decisions in a district.

During the Gartner Security & Risk Management Summit 2017 this past summer, analyst Earl Perkins, research vice president, explained four top trends. (Gettyimages.com: hywards).

Before this new school year started, the Hartford Union High School District in Wisconsin wanted to hire a tech expert to oversee the district’s network.

For a number of years, an aging student information system (SIS) plagued Bethlehem Central Schools, located near Albany, New York. By spring 2013, it was apparent new software was needed to maintain the data about the district’s 4,900 students.

“We correctly predicted our SIS would soon be considered end-of-life and would no longer be supported,” says Dr. Sal DeAngelo, chief technology officer for the district. “We wanted to stay ahead of the curve and find a new solution before that happened.”

 St. Louis Superintendent Kelvin Adams reads to Gateway Elementary School students.

St. Louis Public Schools, the largest district in Missouri, was struggling to stay afloat in 2007, with $40 million dollars of debt and low test scores. In March of that year, the state school board revoked the district’s accreditation for not meeting state standards and took control.

K12 districts and decision makers recognize the importance of leveraging educational data to make informed decisions that support student academic success. 

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