From DA

Matt Zalaznick
June, 2017
Source: State of the States Landscape Report: State-level Policies Supporting Equitable K-12 Computer Science Education.

Syracuse City Schools in New York took a stand in 2015 to protect students from what leaders saw as a prejudice in the college application process.

Abby Spegman
June, 2017
DIVERSE ORIGINS—Stella Ospina, a third-grade teacher at Elon Elementary School in North Carolina’s Alamance-Burlington School System, is part of a staff that includes teachers from Australia, Colombia, Honduras, Jamaica and the United Kingdom.

Districts faced with hard-to-fill vacancies—in math, science and bilingual education, among other subjects—look for candidates abroad, often with help from recruiting agencies

Regina Whitmer
June, 2017
DRAGONS AS PROPS—Students at Pender County Schools in North Carolina, above, play Guild Wars 2, a multiplayer online role-playing game that uses 3D fantastical environments. More teachers are incorporating video games like this as part of core lessons and to help special needs students engage.

In a soon-to-be-released study of eighth-graders in seven states, results reveal that game-based learning can not only engage students, leading them to perform better on assessments, but it can be easily incorporated into lessons.

Jessica Ablamsky
June, 2017
24/7/365?—Some students at Palm Springs USD, above, can take advantage of programs that run before and after school, Saturdays and during the winter and summer breaks to develop a better grasp of the English language and to learn even more about art, dance and science.

Palm Springs USD helps English language learners find success with an extended instructional program that allows students to practice their English skills before or after school, on Saturdays and during breaks.

Jennifer Fink
June, 2017
TECH PREP—Building digital roller coasters and designing other prototypes introduces elementary students in Utica Community Schools in Michigan, above, to the virtual reality tools that they will likely use in college and their future careers in local industry.

In four Utica Community elementary schools in metro Detroit, students as young as 10 manipulate and pull apart the organs of the body, build roller coasters, and design and test 3D prototypes.

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Best practices in reading instruction are always evolving, as researchers are constantly learning how to better support early literacy, particularly for young readers and struggling readers. Recent years have brought more changes to how phonics instruction is emphasized in reading curriculum. Many educators who taught during the Reading First era and later within the Common Core are uncertain about how to best support strong phonics instruction, and thus how to lay the foundation for reading success in their districts.

Literacy is essential for success in school, but when students at the middle and high school levels continue to struggle with reading, the consequences can be lifelong. Struggling adolescent readers are more likely to have discipline or behavioral issues, to have lower academic achievement overall and to drop out of school.

North Hills School District in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, wanted to better engage students in grades 6-12 across its English Language Arts curriculum through a commitment to education technology. 

With the move toward more rigorous digital learning, North Hills piloted StudySync, McGraw-Hill Education’s digital English Language Arts curriculum for grades 6-12, during the 2015-16 school year in two sixth-grade classrooms.

Herb Miller, Director of Education, OverDrive Education

How do you build a digital reading platform that is easy for both students and teachers to use?

Todd Brekhus, President, myON​

What was the reasoning behind wanting to link current events to reading literacy for K8 students?