Spotlight Story

Metro Nashville Public Schools has 25 data specialists and managers considering data. Even one person focused on data is a step forward. (GettyImages.com: Alex Doubovitsky)
1/24/2017

K12 education lags behind U.S. business and industry when it comes to using data to improve outcomes, says a 2016 report by the Center for Data Innovation.

From DA

K12 school leaders forecast top 2017 trends

Matt Zalaznick
January, 2017
Patricia Baltzley, board chair of the Gardiner School District in Montana, many high schools will to redesigned to meet new instructional needs.

Patricia Baltzley

Board chair, Gardiner School District (Mont.)

"The way high schools are currently designed—both with architecture and teaching and learning—needs to be revisioned in all high schools, not just those considered innovative. Instructional needs of the students are different and will continue to be different. We need to get out of the Industrial Age of schooling and move into a more progressive stage."

Douglas County principal reduces tardies with "class bells" music

Ray Bendici
January, 2017
Principal DeMarcos Holland created “Fantastic Fridays" to interact with K12 students on social media.

Principal DeMarcos Holland, of New Manchester High School in the Douglas County School System in Georgia, has replaced traditional class tardy bells with music, including compositions created by students and teachers. The friendlier sounds have lowered the average number of tardies from between 50 and 60 per day to less than 10.

Building a better school principal

Tim Goral
January, 2017
Jody Spiro, Wallace Foundation’s director of education leadership, says the “Principal Pipeline” program allowed six districts to replace their retiring principals and assistant principals with graduates of high-quality training programs.

Jody Spiro, the Wallace Foundation’s director of education leadership, talks about how the “Principal Pipeline” program identifies and develops qualified educators to take on the rigors of becoming a principal.

Family sets tradition of school leadership

Angela Pascopella
January, 2017
PRUSATOR SUMMIT—The Prusator education superintendents get together about four times per year, sometimes bouncing ideas off each other. They joke that one of them will “get it right.” Clockwise from top left, Jeff Prusator, Todd Prusator, father, Robert, who is retired, and Bob Prusator.

School superintendency is a family business for the Prusators. Todd Prusator leads Community Consolidated School District 231 in a small community 70 miles west of Chicago. His two brothers, Bob and Jeff, also are Illinois superintendents, all within about 30 miles of each other in the northwest corner of the state. 

Sponsored content

AT&T offers a host of network options to support the needs of schools and libraries and is investing in innovation  to bring even more efficiency and flexibility into network management.

Reliable, affordable and advanced networking is essential to every educational institution. Demand for communication services that support WANs, Wi-Fi and high-bandwidth educational applications continues to rise as curriculum and instruction increasingly shifts to technology-rich environments.

When two Boston elementary schools needed a core math curriculum,  Everyday Mathematics 4 was the solution

Five years ago, Boston Public School’s John Eliot School in the city’s North End neighborhood was declared an innovation school. What that meant for principal Traci Walker-Griffith was more autonomy in choosing the elementary school’s curriculum for her 570 students. One of the first curricular changes she made was bringing in Everyday Mathematics.

Joni Carswell,  President & CEO,  LivingTree

Decades of research shows that family engagement is the number one driver of student success. Engaged families result in lower truancy rates, higher test scores, and higher graduation rates.

Janet Pittock,  V.P. of Curriculum and Mathematics, Redbird Mathematics,  McGraw-Hill Education, School Group

Educators want to work with students the way they learn best, and we know that one-on-one or small-group instruction is effective. But for the sake of efficiency, schools often employ the “factory” model to teach large numbers of students in a classroom, assuming their age equates to similar positions in their learning progress.

Todd Whitlock, CEO  Standard For Success

It’s no secret teachers are jumping ship in record numbers, and the dwindling numbers of incoming grads don’t even come close to patching the gap as the demand for teachers rises. The Learning Policy Institute reported in 2016 that enrollment in teaching programs is down 35 percent nationwide (and has been for years), and the annual shortfall could grow to 112,000 teachers by 2018 if current trends persist.