Spotlight Story

EXPANDED CURRICULUM—California’s new LGBT curriculum now allows students to learn about the historical impact of LGBT contributors such as Walt Whitman, Willa Cather and Harvey Milk. (gettyimages.com: wynnter).
2/22/2018

California students in fall 2018 will be the first in the U.S. to use textbooks that highlight the historical contributions made by people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender.

From DA

Steven Wyman-Blackburn
February, 2018

The spread of learning on mobile devices has driven providers to push science platforms into the cloud.

Alison DeNisco
February, 2018

In school districts across the country, administrators and teachers unions are increasingly working together to address challenges.

Steven Wyman-Blackburn
February, 2018
AQUATIC UPGRADE—Sonora High School’s new aquatic center includes a bigger 11-lane pool as well as improved locker rooms that feature new fixtures, brighter lighting and better ventilation. (Genevieve Wolff).

The much anticipated third and final phase of Sonora High School’s construction project ended with the creation of a new aquatic center featuring a 25-by-30-yard outdoor community pool.

Ray Bendici
February, 2018
A SECOND COURSE—Jefferson County Public Schools in Louisville has gotten extended use out of buses by turning them into Bus Stop Cafes, mobile cafeterias used to provide free meals to students during the summer months.

Repurposing buses no longer suitable for daily transportation has provided schools with mobile makerspaces, traveling cafés and bookmobiles.

Steven Wyman-Blackburn
February, 2018
Donna Reynolds is principal of Lake Mary High School of Seminole County Public Schools in Florida.

Donna Reynolds, principal of Lake Mary High School of Seminole County Public Schools in Florida, connected with students by performing with the dance team at a pep rally.

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Elementary teachers at Stamford Public Schools in Connecticut, leverage data they gather through observation and evaluation, as well as test scores, to drive classroom math instruction. The technology in their math curriculum, McGraw-Hill Education’s Everyday Mathematics 4®, allows teachers to easily record data and provides detailed reports they use to identify students that might be struggling to master specific state standards, as well as those that are ready for a challenge.

School districts know that “sit-and-get” professional development isn’t working and can have extreme consequences, such as high teacher turnover and poor student performance. To combat this, across the country there is an ongoing, rapid evolution of professional development to be more personalized. While change in education is often slow, this long-overdue advancement is quickly taking shape. 

Timothy Collier has been teaching high school mathematics for more than 30 years, most of them at McAlester High School in southeast Oklahoma, where he is the department chair. State budget cuts have affected McAlester High School and the district’s eight other schools, especially in the area of professional development for teachers, who were facing shifting state standards in math and science.

When it comes to professional development, Regina Teat believes building the instructional capacity of every instructor and classroom teacher is the most effective use of time and money of any program, especially using grant funding.

“When the money goes away, the capacity and knowledge through good professional development for the teacher remains,” says Teat, Director of Elementary Education and Title I & II for Dorchester County Public Schools, a rural district located on Maryland’s eastern shore.