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According to new research from the State Educational Technology Directors Association (SETDA), U.S. schools will need broadband speeds of 100 Mbps per 1,000 students by the 2014-2015 school year to meet increasing demand for Web-based lessons and the growing number of mobile devices used in the classroom. –Source: SETDA (2012)

 

 Putting a Price Tag on the Common Core: How Much Will Smart Implementation Cost?

As school and state leaders across the nation prepare to implement the Common Core State Standards in the fall of 2014, a new report proposes three options—with three costs—to use.

Erin Kominsky knew she needed some magic to keep her school open.

In 1996, Jack L. Weaver Elementary in Los Alamitos, Calif., was the only school in the award-winning, high-performing district that allowed non-residents to enroll. But that opportunity wasn’t enough to fill the classrooms. With only 112 students at the time, Kominsky—principal then and now—looked for a new selling point. 

Enter the MIND Research Institute.

A substantial number of the 45 states plus the District of Columbia that had adopted the Common Core State Standards in math and English Language Arts as of January anticipate major challenges in implementing the online assessments now being developed, according to a report released in January by the Center on Education Policy, an independent public education advocacy organization in Washington, D.C.

With new Common Core State Standards assessments in K12 mathematics due to be in use by the start of the 2014-2015 school year, many district administrators and teachers do not know what they should know about them now and are not taking steps they should be taking to prepare for them. While they are aware that the assessments are being developed, educators generally do not understand what that means to them, according to Doug Sovde, senior advisor to the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for Colleges and Careers (PARCC).

Matthew Peterson

Part of MINDING MATH, a special report from MIND Research Institute

By MATTHEW PETERSON
Co-founder, MIND Research

Part of MINDING MATH, a special report from MIND Research Institute

Part of MINDING MATH: A special report from MIND Research Institute

Most teachers wouldn’t appreciate giving up the spotlight to a penguin. But at Colorado Springs School District 11, teachers don’t seem to mind.

That’s because their students are hooked on ST Math, MIND Research Institute’s innovative program that teaches math with the help of a computer-animated penguin named JiJi.

“We’ve seen upward movement in our students,” said Dave Sawtelle, K-12 math facilitator for the district. The kids, he said, actually look forward to math class.

When I was young, I loved puzzles. My favorite childhood toys were the Rubik’s Cube and the wooden tangram set my grandmother gave me. I’d request logic problems over bedtime stories from my father. He preferred withholding puzzles until morning to prevent me from staying up all night solving them.

Educators at the Los Angeles United School District face a unique challenge. The second largest school district in the country is home to more than 670,000 students and 1,092 school campuses where more than 100 languages are spoken.

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